(Source: fantasies-are-made-of-these, via jb0d-mod)


A photograph of Michelangelo’s “Pietà” by Aurelio Amendola from the art book “Michelangelo: La Dotta Mano.” 

A photograph of Michelangelo’s “Pietà” by Aurelio Amendola from the art book “Michelangelo: La Dotta Mano.” 

(via serendipitousramblings)

"If we see Jesus’s beatitude [“blessed are the poor…”] in the context of common political theology of his time it is quite clear that his connecting of God’s kingdom and the poor is quite astonishing. The poor are powerless so why should they be connected with the supreme power of God? The emperor, rich and powerful, is the normal representative of divine power. His reign is the realization of the divine order. Jesus however ignores the common establishment theology of his time. He neither sees God and his kingdom much connected with the reign of a king or emperor nor does he connect the basileia with the wealthy upper class. The kingdom of God does not belong to those who dedicate to the temple and its cult, but to the poor. God’s kingdom does not belong to those who can afford doing philosophy instead of working, but to the poor. By explicitly connecting God and the poor in an unconditioned makarism, Jesus implicitly disconnects God and the upper class (emperor, high priests, rich and powerful families). The political, economic, and religious establishment seems out of sight when it comes to the Kingdom of God and to whom it belongs. Jesus obviously had no intention at all to legitimize and stabilize the status quo of ancient society. Just the opposite: his preaching derives from apocalyptic roots and can only be seen as a religious disenfranchisement of the political, social and religious conditions predominant in his world."

Joachim Kügler, “The (possible) function of the beatitude of the poor in the context of the struggle against poverty.” Good News for the Poor and the Sick, Acta Theologica Supplementum 16, ed. Pieter Verster. (via locusimperium)

(via ohzeitgeist)

ohzeitgeist:

vandafineclothing:

Worn: Navy-White Dot Shantung Grenadine necktie in an unlined six-fold construction with Pale Blue Gardens square.

To be released on Wed, 27 Aug at 0800hrs EST.

That necktie

freystupid:


Nicolaus de Lyra - Postillae in Prophetas (c. 1423).

Illumination by Master of Otto van Moerdrecht.

freystupid:

Nicolaus de Lyra - Postillae in Prophetas (c. 1423).

Illumination by Master of Otto van Moerdrecht.

(Source: speciesbarocus, via rossodimarte)

(Source: anglo-catholic)

(Source: anglo-catholic)

anglo-catholic:

A rare sighting of what was once common among Archbishops: the chimere with train, and the requisite servers needed to carry it.

anglo-catholic:

A rare sighting of what was once common among Archbishops: the chimere with train, and the requisite servers needed to carry it.

(Source: anglo-catholic)

(Source: anglo-catholic)